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Electronic





Green and Glass orchestrate experimental pop on "14 Hours," play the Footlight 11.6

At the core of Brooklyn-based experimental pop outfit Green and Glass is a mellifluous, dulcet harp—a texture that informs the group’s output with an ethereal and sometimes mysterious quality. Played by bandleader and singer Lucia Stavros (and flanked by a myriad of collaborators from bands like Cuddle Magic and Secret Sibling), her soft, almost whispering vocals, alongside Green and Glass’s various synths, horns, and drums craft a baroque-like march on the band’s debut single “14 Hours.” The synthesis of the group’s various parts manifests an orchestral quality, one that places the group squarely between chamber and synth pop; Green and Glass are tactile in the sounds they choose to incorporate, but do so in an off-kilter manner that embeds the entire track with a hazy, dream-like quality. Stream it below, and catch them at The Footlight on November 6th. -Connor Beckett McInerney 

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Alan Goldsher “Sticky"

Bassist and Producer Alan Goldsher has released the first single, “Sticky”, from his forthcoming album, 96 B.P.M., which will be released on November 12th via Gold Note Records.

This, his second album of 2019, is filled with a funky blend of Jazz and Hip Hop and throwback to groups like Digable Planets and A Tribe Called Quest.

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John Greska “Life as an Ocean"

Neo-Classical composer John Greska has released a new album called Life as an Ocean, his second of 2019.

This is a beautiful blend of classical and ambient electronic music with a few fun surprises.

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Oona Ruin’s Don’t Look Down

Praise be, what a lovely discovery. Oona Ruin’s vocals echo with folk notes, a unique raspy strength, combined with soothing finger picking. A haunting and catchy song that is leaving us hoping and searching for more. Stay tuned for more releases and Bay Area shows. -Michelle Kicherer, Associate Editor





Sofi Tukker Fires Up Stubbs On A Cold Night

 

“I dare you not to dance! I dare you not to dance!” Haiku Hands has a next-level understanding of how to get a crowd to start moving, and that sometimes means using reverse psychology.  The Aussie power-dance quartet asked the crowd to lose control while they danced, and a large Stubbs crowd was willing to oblige since most of them were their to shake their ‘rumbas’ to Sofi Tukker anyway. Haiku Hands served as a perfect opener to Sofi Tukker, stirring up the crowd’s willingness to dance on a chilly October Austin night.

 

Sofi Tukker exploded onto the stage with sexual physicality that was emphasized by pulsating rhythms and primitive percussion. If it was Sofi Tukker’s intention to coax the animalistic tendencies out of the crowd, they succeeded all too well. The throng of dancers in the crowd had created an amorphous vibrating organism of bliss.  Songs like “Fuck They” and “Mi Rumba” continued to level-up the energy with each consecutive track.

 

The beauty of a Sofi Tukker set is their song quality is strong enough to sprinkle in hits at the outset but still have enough to backload the end of the set and encore. “Swing”, “Best Friend”, “Batshit” and “Purple Hat”  all rapid-fired with out regard to the physical limitations of endurance for those who were dancing. The set would end with the duo’s most romanticized track “Fantasy” which allayed the crowd with beautiful deep house odyssey. A one-song encore would ensue in which they would play “Drinkee” and send the sweaty crowd smiling into the Austin night.

 

 

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